Elaine Salo Fungai Machirori Selfie Sticky post

Rest In Love, Dear Elaine Rosa Salo

A surge of heat courses through my blood as soon as I see the email with a simple but foreboding subject line. ‘Elaine’, it reads. Warily, I open it and take in its words, my body quickly collapsing into disbelieving heaves and sobs. “No, no, no.” I repeat the word as though a chorus of my protest will undo what I am reading. As though … Continue reading Rest In Love, Dear Elaine Rosa Salo

Warsan Shire Teaching My Mother How To Give Birth

On Reading ‘Teaching My Mother How To Give Birth’ by Warsan Shire

It is a cool crisp Saturday morning in bed. I have a backlog of reading to get through, which is always confusing and daunting to navigate. Which book is worth my time? Which one will make the effort worth it at the end of the last chapter? As I do my routine rounds on Facebook, I notice two friends’ posts about Warsan Shire. One is … Continue reading On Reading ‘Teaching My Mother How To Give Birth’ by Warsan Shire

Bring Back Our Girls

Here Is My Body – For The 234 Missing Nigerian Girls

Here is my body, I’m giving it you to weigh on your market scales, to tell me the value of each pound of flesh; each coil and cuticle and cell of hair, skin, bone. You tell me you are making subtractions for my sex my colour my continent, recalculating the weight of my worth as the needle of your measure rotates backwards like a delirious … Continue reading Here Is My Body – For The 234 Missing Nigerian Girls

Fungai Machirori Amina Doherty

African Feminisms and Grant-Making: In Conversation with Amina Doherty

I had the great privilege this week to meet some powerful women from across Africa, and the world, at a meeting convened by Just Associates (JASS) to discuss among other things, feminist movement building across southern Africa. What I found most refreshing was the openness of the space, and those involved within it. I also had the fortune to finally meet Amina Doherty, who brings a young, … Continue reading African Feminisms and Grant-Making: In Conversation with Amina Doherty

Pokello Nare

The problem with hating Pokello

I am still recovering from the disbelief I experienced earlier today when I read an opinion piece forthrightly titled ‘Why women Hate Pokello’. An anonymous writer, a Zimbabwean woman I presume, enters into a long narrative about why ‘we’ Zimbabwean women HATE Pokello Nare, one of the Zimbabwean representatives in the Big Brother House this year. We hate her because she is full of herself … Continue reading The problem with hating Pokello